Musea

Middelheim Museum:Traces of the First World War in the Middelheimmuseum collection

Ernst Barlach, Georg Kolbe, Alexander Archipenko, Jean Arp, Emile-Antoine Bourdelle, Jacques Lipchitz, Ossip Zadkine, Charles Despiau, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Paul Landowski, Rudolf Belling, Aristide Maillol, François Pompon, Arturo Martini, Ewald Mataré, Hermann Hubacher, Frans Claessens, Käthe Kollwitz, Georges Braque, Philippe Wolfers, Emil Filla, Arthur Dupon, Josué Dupon. The lives of these artists in the Middelheim collection, on both sides of the front, was harshly interrupted by the First World War, which cut through their lives and (early) careers much like a blunt axe.

FotoMuseum: Shooting Range. Photography in the firing line?

The 'Great War' was the first large-scale conflict that was recorded on celluloid and film. The fledgling media appeared to have unprecedented powers as the all-seeing eye, a reminder, but also as a weapon. Images not only chronicle a conflict, they also play a crucial role in it. Shooting Range highlights the way in which this happened in a conflict that kept the world in its grip for four years. FoMu shows how still image was used in newspapers, magazines, postcards or for military purposes. Propaganda and anti-war films also serve to widen the concept of this world conflict.

ROYAL MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS ANTWERP AND THE PROVINCE OF ANTWERP, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE HOUSE OF LITERATURE AND THE PROVINCIAL MUSEUM EMILE VERHAEREN: The Moderns. Art during the Great War.

Before the outbreak of the First World War the futuristic works of Jules Schmalzigaug suggested progress, speed and technology. Rik Wouters’ art was a celebration of vitality and strength. But the war came as a shock. This exhibition shows how artists and writers absorbed this shock during and shortly after the First World War. Some artists and writers fled to the Netherlands and Great Britain, where they discovered foreign movements. Others tried to make sense of life on and behind the front lines.

Red Star Line Museum: Far from the War? Belgian immigrants in America during World War I.

In the early twentieth century, in the years running up to the First World War, Belgian migration to the United States peaked. When the German army occupied Belgium in 1914 all trans-Atlantic passenger traffic from Antwerp ground to a halt. Belgian Americans suddenly found themselves cut off from their motherland and in many cases from their family. How did they experience the war? How did they express their solidarity with their country of origin?

Museum of Contemporary Art Antwerp: PANAMARENKO UNIVERSUM

The exhibition “Panamarenko Universum” provides a fascinating overview of the most important vehicles and objects which the Antwerp artist created. Besides these masterpieces the exhibition also focuses on Panamarenko’s actions in the broadest sense of the word, with his “happening” period – from the occupation of Conscienceplein square to his bold attempt to fly to Sonsbeek in the Netherlands with a zeppelin -, his nature and scientific insights and artistic statements. For the first time an exhibition will zoom in on the artist’s sources of inspiration.